News and Views

Bethlehem Sands says, smoke ‘em if you got ‘em

soapboxBethlehem Sands says, smoke ‘em if you got ‘em — Take a look at the amazing difference in revenue from the smoking versus the non smoking sections.

At Sands, smoking-section machines have brought in $384 per day, compared with $181 for nonsmoking-section machines.

Philadelphia Park Casino’s smoking section machine took in $583 per machine per day, compared with $210 for its nonsmoking machines. Mount Airy’s smoking-section machines took in $380 a day, while its nonsmoking-section machines took just $133, according to numbers released by the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board.

So…what does this mean?  Understand the characteristics of the gamer… are they all this way NO…but you better believe this:   Frequently, people who enjoy gambling enjoy being able to smoke and drink as well.

http://www.mcall.com/news/all-a1_4sands.6997841aug25,0,7764074.story

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Thursday, August 27th, 2009 News and Views No Comments

Catch Your Employees Doing Something Right

binocular

If you want to do one thing today to make your employees more productive, then go to the casino floor and catch them doing something right.  We’re all busy – it’s easy to get in the habit of quickly walking through the facility on the way to the office, pointing out the things along the way that are wrong.  You know you’ve done it:  “Why is that trash overflowing?”  “Pat’s uniform looks like she slept in it.”   “John, how about a little enthusiasm?”

There’s no doubt that these types of things need to be corrected (more about that in the next installment), but what are you doing to keep the majority of your staff, the people who are already doing it right, motivated?  It’s easy once you learn the steps and get in the habit and it will definitely inspire your team to keep up the good work.   Here are the steps to praising employees in one minute or less:

  1.  Be Specific:  Tell the person you see doing it right exactly what they are doing that you want them to continue.  Don’t just say “Good job, Jan”; say “Jan, wow, I noticed the way you got those blackjack players fired up about their game!”
  2. Be Immediate:  If you are trying, you’ll catch people in the act of doing things right every day.  That’s when you mention it; don’t save your praise up for a rainy day.
  3. Share How You Feel About It:  Back to Jan and her blackjack table, add to the power of your praising by saying “When you work the table like that, I am thrilled because I know that those customers will be back!”
  4. Encourage the Individual:  Make sure the employee knows that you want them to keep behaving the same way in the future.  End your praising with a comment like “Keep up the good work, you are treating our customers exactly right.”

So here is the entire thing:

“Jan, wow, I noticed the way you got those blackjack players fired up about their game just now!  I love it when you work the table like that because I know that those customers will be back.  Keep up the good work.  You are treating our customers exactly right and they are having a great time.”

How easy is that?  How motivated would you feel if someone said something like that to you?

Learn those four steps and just do it!

Based on by The One Minute Manager by Kenneth H. Blanchard (Author), Spencer Johnson (Author)

Want to teach your entire team?  Contact rebecca@yourcasinocoach.com for great training that your team can use tomorrow.

 

Coaching02

Caught You Doing Something…WRONG!?!?!

Now that you have been practicing “catching people doing things right” for a few weeks you have probably come smack up against someone who isn’t doing things right.  Now what do you do?

Pat is constantly standing by the entrance to the casino talking to other employees instead of greeting guests as they walk in.  The next time you witness this behavior (which will probably be tomorrow since he seems to be doing this every day when you arrive) try this:

  1. Be Specific:  Pull the employee aside and tell the person what they are doing that you want them to stop.  Don’t say “Pat, you are driving me and everyone else crazy with all of your talking and ignoring customers!”   Instead, pull Pat aside and say “Pat, I have seen you talking to coworkers and ignoring customers every day this week when I have come in.  I expect you to limit your conversations with coworkers, especially when customers are around.”
  2. Be Immediate:  Just like praising people, don’t save up your reprimands.  When you see something going wrong, address it!
  3. Share How You Feel About It:  Back to Pat and the front door, let him know how you feel about it by saying “Pat, it really makes me mad when our customers are being ignored while you have conversations with other employees at the front door.  It also irritates me that you are keeping your coworkers from doing their jobs when you have long conversations with them.”
  4. Encourage the Individual:  That’s right—just like praising someone you end a reprimand with encouragement. This may seem counterintuitive, but you want to make sure the employee leaves the conversation thinking about what they did wrong rather than thinking about what a mean boss you are.   Focus on the behavior rather than the individual to reduce defensiveness.  End your reprimand with a comment like “Pat, I wouldn’t even bring this to your attention if I didn’t know that you can do better and fix this.  You are a valuable employee and the role you play in greeting our guests when they first arrive really sets the stage for the experience they will have at the casino.  I know you can do it!”

So once again, here is the entire thing:

“Pat, can I talk with you for a minute?  I have seen you talking to coworkers and ignoring customers every day this week when I have come into work.  I get really irritated when you ignore guests and keep other employees from doing their jobs.  Going forward, you need to limit your conversations with coworkers, especially when customers are around.    Now Pat, you really know how to make our customers feel welcome, and I wouldn’t even bring this up to you unless I knew you could fix it.  I know you can do it!”

That won’t take you long at all (that’s why it’s called a “One-Minute Reprimand”!)  and the results are almost always instantaneous.  People want to do the right thing, they just need a little direction from time-to-time and using a one-minute reprimand really works.

Same four steps as the praising.  Easy.  Problem solved!

Based on by The One Minute Manager by Kenneth H. Blanchard (Author), Spencer Johnson (Author)

Want to teach your entire team?  Contact rebecca@yourcasinocoach.com for great training that your team can use tomorrow.

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Wednesday, August 26th, 2009 Lead Right Now 1 Comment

Station Casinos Founder, Frank Fertitta Jr. Dies

Frank_Fertittahttp://www.casinoenterprisemanagement.com/newswire/station-casinos-founder-frank-fertitta-jr-dies

Wednesday, August 26th, 2009 News and Views No Comments

News and Views

soapboxGaming is adult entertainment.  There are tribes that struggle with meshing their tribal culture and beliefs with gambling environments.  While certain aspects of casinos and gaming involve the potential perpetuation of some of the ills that are suffered in Indian country, tribes have to understand that gaming is for adults and is not designed to prevent or cure social problems.  

An example of this dilemma is when a small tribe decides to add a full-service bar to their casino property.  In many communities the casino can provide some of the best entertainment in the safest environment, attracting a broad range of guests.   Revenues from bars in casinos are good.  Liquor is a high-margin product that can add to the spend per player in a small casino and provide a way to get people to the casino who normally might not go there.   Once there, they stay and play. 

Operational problems can arise when tribal factions, worried about problem drinking in their communities, attempt to limit the sale of liquor in the casino.  Again, a clear vision of why the casino exists must be shared and supported by all involved.  Tribal leaders and casino operators must come to the obvious conclusion:  if your casino is going to survive and thrive, tribal politics and a morality-police mentality cannot be part of the mix.

What you must commit to as a casino manager is providing a clean, safe environment, having well-trained staff, eradicating any illegal activity and trouble-makers, and creating an enjoyable entertainment experience for adult gamblers.  Successful casino gaming will never be bingo in the church basement.  I know from experience that with about 100 tribal gaming facilities in the state of Oklahoma, the competition for the customers is fierce.  Tribal leaders and casino operators must understand adult entertainment and commit to giving customers what they want, even when it may not fit exactly with the values of individual tribal members.

All this being said, it doesn’t mean that creating a positive image and being a positive influence in the communities where tribal casinos operate isn’t of paramount importance.  Participating in the community in a positive way can be successfully accomplished through a variety of means.  More about that in future installments.

–Copyright 2009 Davis Tripp.  No portion may be reprinted or used without permission of the author.  Contact davis@yourcasinocoach.com

Watch for weekly installments of Trials and Tribe-ulations.

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Sunday, August 23rd, 2009 News and Views No Comments

News and Views

nprlogo_138x46Revenue-Hungry States Take New Look At Gaming

Sunday, August 23rd, 2009 News and Views No Comments

Caught You Doing Something…WRONG!?!?

Coaching02Now that you have been practicing “catching people doing things right” for a few weeks you have probably come smack up against someone who isn’t doing things right.  Now what do you do?

Pat is constantly standing by the entrance to the casino talking to other employees instead of greeting guests as they walk in.  The next time you witness this behavior (which will probably be tomorrow since he seems to be doing this every day when you arrive) try this:

  1. Be Specific:  Pull the employee aside and tell the person what they are doing that you want them to stop.  Don’t say “Pat, you are driving me and everyone else crazy with all of your talking and ignoring customers!”   Instead, pull Pat aside and say “Pat, I have seen you talking to coworkers and ignoring customers every day this week when I have come in.  I expect you to limit your conversations with coworkers, especially when customers are around.”
  2. Be Immediate:  Just like praising people, don’t save up your reprimands.  When you see something going wrong, address it!
  3. Share How You Feel About It:  Back to Pat and the front door, let him know how you feel about it by saying “Pat, it really makes me mad when our customers are being ignored while you have conversations with other employees at the front door.  It also irritates me that you are keeping your coworkers from doing their jobs when you have long conversations with them.”
  4. Encourage the Individual:  That’s right—just like praising someone you end a reprimand with encouragement. This may seem counterintuitive, but you want to make sure the employee leaves the conversation thinking about what they did wrong rather than thinking about what a mean boss you are.   Focus on the behavior rather than the individual to reduce defensiveness.  End your reprimand with a comment like “Pat, I wouldn’t even bring this to your attention if I didn’t know that you can do better and fix this.  You are a valuable employee and the role you play in greeting our guests when they first arrive really sets the stage for the experience they will have at the casino.  I know you can do it!”

So once again, here is the entire thing:

“Pat, can I talk with you for a minute?  I have seen you talking to coworkers and ignoring customers every day this week when I have come into work.  I get really irritated when you ignore guests and keep other employees from doing their jobs.  Going forward, you need to limit your conversations with coworkers, especially when customers are around.    Now Pat, you really know how to make our customers feel welcome, and I wouldn’t even bring this up to you unless I knew you could fix it.  I know you can do it!”

That won’t take you long at all (that’s why it’s called a “One-Minute Reprimand”!)  and the results are almost always instantaneous.  People want to do the right thing, they just need a little direction from time-to-time and using a one-minute reprimand really works.

Same four steps as the praising.  Easy.  Problem solved!

Based on by The One Minute Manager by Kenneth H. Blanchard (Author), Spencer Johnson (Author)

Want to teach your entire team?  Contact rebecca@yourcasinocoach.com for great training that your team can use tomorrow.

Monday, August 10th, 2009 Lead Right Now No Comments

News and Views

Tune in here for news and views.soapbox

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Thursday, July 30th, 2009 News and Views No Comments